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Behind the Design: Fabula by Slamp

Behind the Design: Fabula by Slamp

With soft, intertwining elements, Slamp’s latest design is at once evocative and mysterious.

Written by Megan Morgan

It looks like a long, silk ribbon, delicately woven into complex curves. The Fabula Pendant is the latest design from Slamp, an Italian design brand that has built itself on a curiosity for new materials and experimentation. Fabula is a soft, mysterious shape made from interwoven Lentiflex®, fitting seamlessly into the vast Slamp collection. We talked more about the evolution of Fabula with its creator: renowned designer, artist and documentary filmmaker Constantin Morosin.

Constantin Morosin

Constantin Morosin, designer of the Fabula by Slamp.

Tell us about the Fabula.

The Fabula suspension originates from non-Euclidean geometry, and instead is an intertwining form made of mysterious, complex curves that, graphically speaking, are difficult even to describe. I was inspired by the expressive possibilities that Venetian glass possesses. Lentiflex®, Slamp’s patented polymer that I chose for this lamp, imitates a particular glass-like effect with its microscopic grooves, while remaining malleable and lightweight. Thanks to the material, Fabula has rich, delicate yet strong diffractions that reflect the light and color of any environment it is illuminating. Its four color options easily adapt in any space, and the magnetic system makes it easy to hang, clean, and change the light bulbs. The packaging received the same attention to detail that the lamp itself did.

Fabula Pendant by SLAMP

Slamp’s Fabula Pendant is a statement maker, with never-ending twists and turns of prismatic light made from Slamp’s signature patented material, Lentiflex®.

You have had a prolific career in the arts – documentary filmmaking, sculpture, painting and even permanent monuments. How did you come to design for Slamp and specifically the world of lighting?

As a young man, I designed lighting for nightclubs. Light makes us joyful! Its immateriality connects us to the infinite sublime. I designed Fabula along with the Slamp team after learning that this company has reached international recognition for their excellence. Fabula came about due to this collaboration, one that reflects my own attention to the manual, artisanal execution of a piece.

You graduated from The Academy of Fine Arts in Venice in 1975. What have you learned along the way about life and work?

My years in Venice were particularly happy ones. I majored in scenography, which connects the artist, work, space and public as one. I believe that art should be sustainable in order ensure the probability that it will deliver its message over time. The noble use of materials is when they are used in designs that exhibit aesthetic and anthropological value.

Of all the different types of work that you do – which is your favorite medium and why?

My training and education were multidisciplinary; I have worked in art, anthropology and the evolution of artistic language and technology. I have always had close ties to nature. Using this same philosophy, I have created works throughout the world called SIGNA. This is virtual graffiti, based on GPS technology that can be viewed by using an iPhone app. They are normally large portraits, including one of my mother in a Venetian field, or that of Obama over the entirety of the United States in 2008. By making this type of work, I have moved toward the future, utilizing technology, without forgetting about what is important about my past.

Take a peek at what goes into each Fabula design from start to finish:

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